Air France passengers stranded in Manchester ‘so pilot can rest’


FROM TELEGRAPH UK FEBRUARY 24 2015


Air France passengers stuck in Manchester

Air France passengers stuck in Manchester Photo: Manchester Evening News Syndication /Picture from Telegraph, UK

 

Passengers on a plane diverted to Manchester from New York were left stranded onboard without food and water for seven hours to avoid the pilot exceeding his maximum work hours. The 460 people aboard the Air France flight to Paris landed at Manchester at 11.30am on Saturday, but were not allowed off until around 6pm. The diversion was doubly frustrating for British passengers, who were initially told they would have to continue to Paris and then fly back to the UK – including one woman who lives just a couple of miles from Manchester Airport. The flight had been delayed from taking off by around four hours at New York while queueing to be de-iced. It meant the plane’s pilot would have exceeded his flying time before…continue reading

‘The Media Doesn’t Care What Happens Here’

Can amateur journalism bring justice to Rio’s favelas?

 Police officers patrolling the streets of Vila Cruzeiro, another favela in Rio, near where a motorbike taxi driver was killed hours earlier. Credit Sebastián Liste/Noor Images, for The New York Times

Police officers patrolling the streets of Vila Cruzeiro, another favela in Rio, near where a motorbike taxi driver was killed hours earlier. Credit Sebastián Liste/Noor Images, for The New York Times /Picture from New York Times


TEXT AND PICTURE FROM NEW YORK TIMES FEBRUARY 18 2015 BY


 

The favelas of Complexo do Alemão, one of the largest urban slums in Brazil, spill across 700 hilly acres in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro, not far from the city’s international airport. Bounded on three sides by bustling highways and on the fourth by a forested ridge, Alemão can no longer grow outward, and so it has grown upward instead, in increasingly unstable conglomerations of quadruple-decker concrete boxes. “The grandfather builds the first floor, the son the second, the grandson the third and the great-grandson the fourth,” residents like to say. Rebar sprouts from the rooftops, awaiting the installation of the next story and the next generation that will occupy it…continue reading

Muslims form ‘ring of peace’ to protect Oslo synagogue


FROM TELEGRAPH, UK FEBRUARY 22 2015


Norway’s Chief Rabbi Michael Melchior sang the traditional Jewish end of Shabaat song outside the Oslo synagogue before a large crowd holding hands.

Norway’s Chief Rabbi Michael Melchior sang the traditional Jewish end of Shabaat song outside the Oslo synagogue before a large crowd holding hands. / Picture from Telegraph UK

 

More than 1,000 people formed a “ring of peace” Saturday outside Oslo’s main synagogue at the initiative of a group of young Muslims. The event in the Norwegian capital follows a series of attacks against Jews in Europe, including the terror attacks in Paris in January and in neighboring Denmark last week. One of the eight independent organisers of Saturday’s event in Oslo, Hajrah Arshad said the gathering shows “that Islam is about love and unity.”

“We want to demonstrate that Jews and Muslims do not hate each other,” co-organiser Zeeshan Abdullah told the crowd, standing in a half-circle…continue reading

Malcolm X assassination: 50 years on, mystery still clouds details of the case

 Despite freedom of information act requests throughout the years, New York still will not release records to the public and claim files would endanger the safety of police officers and constitute unwarranted invasions of privacy

TEXT AND PICTURE FROM guardian.co.uk FEBRUARY 21 2015 Garrett Felber

Agent Wood hides face from photographer. Photograph: Star.

Agent Wood hides face from photographer. Photograph: Star. /Picture from guardian.co.uk

 

Malcolm X was a dangerous man. Not dangerous as the widely circulated image of him holding a rifle and peeking through the curtains in his home would suggest. Nor because he disagreed with the nonviolent wing of the civil rights movement and its assertion that racial integration was the primary objective of the black freedom struggle. By challenging integration as a primary goal, Malcolm X threatened to undermine the tenuous support that mainstream civil rights leaders were receiving from the government and white liberals. For many white people, Malcolm and the Nation of Islam embodied their greatest fears.

As the public face of the National of Islam, he confronted racism well beyond the confines of southern segregation. He worked tirelessly to denounce America as a damaging imperialist and neo-colonialist system. “Just as a chicken cannot produce a duck egg”, he charged, “the system in this country cannot produce…continue reading

What Would Malcolm X Think?

Malcolm X Credit Associated Press

Malcolm X Credit Associated Press / Picture from New York Times


FROM NEW YORK TIMES FEBRUARY 20 2015 BY ILYASAH SHABAZZ


NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. — FIFTY years ago today my father, Malcolm X, was assassinated while speaking at the Audubon Ballroom in New York City. I think about him every day, but even more in the last year, with the renewed spirit of civil rights activism after the tragic events in Ferguson, Mo., on Staten Island and in countless other parts of the country. What would he have to say about it?

People still look to Malcolm as a model for strident activism. They lament the lack of such a prominent, resonant voice in the modern dialogue about race. But they might not like some of the critical things he would have to say about the strategies of today’s activists.

Of course, my father would be heartened by the youth-led movement taking place across the nation, and abroad, in response to institutional brutality. And he would appreciate the protesters’ fervor and skillful use of social media to rapidly organize, galvanize and educate. In a sense, his ability to boil down hard truths into strong statements and catchy phrases presaged our era of hashtag activism.

But he would be the first to say that slogans aren’t action. They amount to nothing but a complaint filed against a system that does not care. In his speeches, he did not simply cry “Inequality!” — he demanded justice, and he laid out the steps necessary to achieve it.

He counseled smart action to circumvent the inevitable consequences of systemic injustice. When he spoke about “the ballot or the bullet,” America sat up and took notice as he articulated the searing reality that, if not…continue reading

Guardian ‘changed Iraq article to avoid offending Apple’

“Graffiti” aside : Is it the battle of the titans?


FROM TELEGRAPH UK FEBRUARY 20 2015


 

The Guardian is accused of changing a story on its website to avoid offending Apple Photo: Julian Simmonds

The Guardian is accused of changing a story on its website to avoid offending Apple Photo: Julian Simmonds / Picture from The Telegraph UK

 

The Guardian is facing questions over its relationship with advertisers after allegations that it changed a news article amid concerns about offending Apple. The media organisation has criticised The Telegraph for failing to observe the “Chinese wall” between advertising and editorial coverage, a claim The Telegraph strongly denies. However, The Telegraph can disclose that in July last year Apple bought wraparound advertising on The Guardian’s website and stipulated that the advertising should not be placed next to negative news.

A Guardian insider said that the headline of an article about Iraq on The…continue reading

India to spend £10BILLION on new warships and submarines – as Britain finally prepares to axe financial aid to world’s 10th biggest economy


TEXT AND PICTURE FROM DAILY MAIL FEBRUARY 20 2015 BY JOHN STEVEN


Military prowess: India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi (centre) wants to build a strong military for fear the country would be unable to fight a two-front war with China and Pakistan

Military prowess: India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (centre) wants to build a strong military for fear the country would be unable to fight a two-front war with China and Pakistan / Picture from Daily Mail UK

India’s government has cleared the plan to build its most advanced warships just months after making its order for new submarines in October. The orders are part of a plan to try to close the gap with the Chinese navy in the Indian Ocean. Since taking over last year, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has signalled his resolve to build a strong military after following claims the country would be unable to fight a two-front war against China and Pakistan…continue reading

 

Tariq Ali: ‘Renationalise the railways. Cut military spending. Argue with whoever says it can’t be done’

A leading figure of the British left since the 60s, Tariq Ali despairs of Westminster and the ‘extreme centre’ that dominates politics today. His solution? It’s not to trust Ed Miliband – it’s to follow the principles laid out by his father

Vanessa Redgrave and Tariq Ali at an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in London in 1968.

Vanessa Redgrave and Tariq Ali at an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in London in 1968. /Picture from guardian.co.uk

 


FROM guardian.co.uk FEBRUARY 20 2015 Stuart Jeffries


Tariq Ali is recalling a party for the late Tony Benn on the House of Commons terrace shortly after Labour’s 1997 election victory. “Edward Miliband, as he was known then, came up to me, eyes shining, very excited, asking: ‘Tariq, what would you do if you had just won?’ I said: ‘The first thing I would do is to renationalise the railways. Between 70 and 80% of the people want that, it would be very popular.’ And he rolled his eyes in despair at me.”

That Milibandian eye roll was, for Ali, a symbolic moment: it typified how the current Labour leader had snapped into line with the Blairite betrayal of the social democratic principles of the party that, under Clement Attlee, had created the NHS and nationalised the commanding heights of the economy – the very principles that Ed’s father Ralph Miliband stood for.

Indeed, in his introduction to a new collection of Ralph Miliband’s writing, calledClass War Conservatism and Other Essays, Ali quotes his anti-capitalist socialist intellectual friend approvingly on the nature of that betrayal. “The failure of social democracy implicates not only those responsible for it,” wrote Ralph Miliband. “Because of it the path is made smoother for would-be popular saviours, whose extreme conservatism is carefully concealed beneath a demagogic rhetoric of national renewal and social redemption.”

Ralph Miliband, who died in 1994, did not live to see New Labour in power, still…continue reading

The Telegraph’s promise to our readers


FROM TELEGRAPH UK DATED FEBRUARY 19 2015 BY TELEGRAPH VIEW


 

This newspaper makes no apology for the way in which it has covered the HSBC group and the allegations of wrongdoing by its Swiss subsidiary, allegations that have been so enthusiastically promoted by the BBC, the Guardian and their ideological soulmates in the Labour Party. We have covered this matter as we do all others, according to our editorial judgment and informed by our values. Foremost among those values is a belief in free enterprise and free markets.

We are proud to be the champion of British business and enterprise. In an age of cheap populism and corrosive cynicism about wealth-creating businesses, we have defended British industries including the financial services industry that accounts for almost a tenth of the UK economy, sustains two million jobs and provides around one in every eight pounds the Exchequer raises in tax.

We will take no lectures about journalism from the likes of the BBC, the Guardian or the Times. Those media outlets that are this week sniping about our coverage of HSBC were similarly dismissive in 2009 when we began to reveal details of MPs’ expenses claims, a fact that speaks volumes about their judgment and partiality.

Our support for Britain’s financial services has never blinded us to the failings of the industry. In 2012, we revealed that HSBC was at the centre of a major HM Revenue and Customs investigation after it opened offshore accounts in Jersey for criminals living in this country. Many of the…continue reading

Telegraph owners’ £250m HSBC loan raises fresh questions over coverage

Barclay brothers secured loan for loss-making company shortly before Telegraph reporters were allegedly discouraged from running articles critical of HSBC

Telegraph owners the Barclay brothers

Telegraph owners the Barclay brothers / Picture from guardian.co.uk

 


FROM THE GUARDIAN UK DATED FEBRUARY 19 2015 Simon Bowers


 

The owners of the Daily Telegraph secured a £250m loan from HSBC for a struggling corner of their business empire shortly before the newspaper’s reporters were allegedly “discouraged” from running articles critical of the bank, the Guardian has learned.

The timing of the loan deal for Yodel, a loss-making parcel delivery firm owned by the Barclay brothers, raises fresh questions over the influence of commercial considerations on the Telegraph’s editorial coverage of HSBC.

The deal was completed on 14 December 2012, company documents show. The paper’s former chief political commentator Peter Oborne alleged this week that there was a sea change in its editorial treatment of the bank from early 2013.

The documents show that Sir David and Sir Frederick Barclay had to formally give a personal financial guarantee as additional security for the loan facility.

The paper’s editorial judgment over HSBC has been called into question this week by Oborne, who accused the paper of a “fraud on its readers” in an excoriating resignation statement.

Specifically, he claims that the Telegraph’s coverage of the bank changed abruptly just over two years ago. “From the start of 2013 onwards stories critical of HSBC were discouraged,” he said.

Yodel refinanced in mid-December 2012 with Europe’s biggest bank. As security, the bank took a charge over almost all the Yodel business – meaning the bank could take…continue reading